Posted by / Category Cultural Differences, Stereotypes /

If you follow me on twitter (https://twitter.com/FrenchYumMummy), you know that I have decided to stay in Sydney a little bit longer to enjoy the Aussie way of life. I had come to a point where I couldn’t take one more British winter, and a change was long overdue after close to 15 years in Blighty. Not to mention that I am a nomad at heart. In short, here I am, and loving it. So, what did I learn? Well, so far, so good. The running is amazing and it’s incredibly warm compared to Europe. But let’s not wait, here are my main findings after a few weeks:

  1. 1. People TALK. I know, it’s amazing, right? Over here, you say ‘Hello!’ to the bus driver, to fellow runners, to the concierge or the cashier. You might even strike a conversation. For the record, I haven’t heard anyone say ‘G’day, mate!’ just yet. It must be urban legend. That said, you might strike a conversation with somebody you don’t know. Come on, it’s shocking! In London, you shut up. It’s considered rude to talk to others, and most of the time nobody will reply if you do. Not to mention that I always took the automatic check-out anyway.
  2. 2. I am a control freak. I totally need to relax. That’s probably what London does for you. Things are very chilled over here, and slower than in England. Simply put, it freaks me out. When, for instance, the food is slow to come, the light remains red for too long or the shop doesn’t open bang on time, I feel like the world is coming to an end. I. Need. To. Relax.

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Posted by / Category Stereotypes /

Things are slowly starting to pick up after the Christmas break. In Australia, nobody has commented on my French accent, and it’s pure bliss. In London, I keep being reminded that I am ‘different’. What I particularly hate is when my interlocutor pretends he (Let’s face it: it’s usually a he) doesn’t understand what I am saying. It hasn’t happened in Sydney, which makes me wonder what is wrong with British men (selective hearing maybe?). Obviously, according to them, we French women are supposed to ‘have it all’. We must look like a trophy wife, but we must also be strong-minded and financially independent. What a load of codswallop!

Come to think of it, this ‘having-it-all’ concept is really getting on my nerves right now. It must have something to do with middle-age. In no particular order, I am supposed to be beautiful, stylish, thin, independent, intelligent and healthy of course. Not to mention a good mother/wife/friend/cook/coach/taxi/business woman, etc. Here is a newsflash for everybody: I only have 24 hours a day. My life is already pretty full-on. And I am far from perfect.

As we were working long hours on a new project the other day, one of the (British) assistants cracked a joke:

‘But Muriel, you are French! With the hours you are working you wouldn’t be able to have a torrid love affair.’

Here we go again, I thought. How very un-French…

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Posted by / Category Stereotypes /

It’s this time of the year I suppose. But fear not: I will not patronise anyone (I am too old for that anyway). I just wanted to share with you my New Year’s resolutions. As I never keep them, I thought that I should make a lot of them -some big, some small- to make sure that I keep at least some of them. That’s just me: I always have a fallback plan. At my ripe age, you have to be pragmatic, right?

The problem is that we often only follow through with good intentions for a week or so. The more strong-minded among us may last a month, but sooner or later we all end up falling back into the same old ways which we tried so hard to change. (Let’s come clean: when I say ‘we’, I mean, well, ‘me’).

Why does this happen? And how can we improve our goal-setting strategies?

I have read somewhere that often our goals transform into failures because they’re not solid enough to maintain our motivation, or because they’re perhaps too hard to reach. According to psychologists, if we want to welcome a change and make New Year’s resolutions for real, we must use a strategy called SMART Goals, which outlines the criteria of successful goal-setting (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, relevant, Timely). Seriously? Again, fear not: I won’t bore you with this corporate BS (Excuse my French). Again, been there, done it, and I am sick and tired of having to agree with Powerpoint slides and so-called experts anyway. I have pretended to do so for far too long. My new mantra is more real life, less theory. Call it MindLessNess if you want. I have just made it up as well. I think I am on to something…

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